WOAI Local News Sponsored by Five Star Cleaners

 

Report on Lackland Sex Abuse Scandal to be Released Today

Report on Lackland Sex Abuse Scandal to be Released Today

  The United States Air Force today will release the results of the five month investigation into the sex with recruits scandal at Lackland Air Force Base, and will make recommendations on policy and personnel changes to make sure the scandal doesn't happen again, 1200 WOAI news reports.

 

  "General Edward Rice appointed Maj. Gen Margaret Woodward to head the command directed investigation back in June," Brent Boller, a spokesman for Joint Base San Antonio-Lackland told 1200 WOAI news.

 

  Eleven Military Training Instructors at Lackland have been charged with offenses ranging from having improper relations with female recruits to rape, and 14 more have been notified they are under investigation.  Boller says a total of 48 women have come forward to report they have been victims of improper sexual activities by their MTI.

 

  Boller says the 38 members of the investigation board left no stone unturned.

 

  "They conducted hundreds of interviews, and surveyed more than 18,000 people," Boller said.  "They visited training locations, visited sister service trainign schools, and conducted focus groups with basic trainees."

 

  The Lackland affair is the worst military sex scandal in 16 years, and has been compared to the Tailhook Scandal of 1991, where Naval aviators attending a convention in Las Vegas groped, sexually assaulted, and raped women who were forced to 'run a gauntlet' in a hotel hallway.

 

  To show how important the Air Force considers the report, Gen. Mark A. Walsh, the Chief of Staff of the Air Force, plans to join Air Education and Training Commander Gen. Edward Rice and Gen. Woodward at today's release at the Pentagon.

 

  Many critics, including key members of the House Armed Services Committee who toured Lackland last month, are demanding 'systemic' changes, including a policy that strips the military of the right to investigate sexual misconduct cases, moving them to an outside body.  They say the Air Force 'culture' condones and even encourages 'misogynistic' sexually demeaning treatment of women.

 

More Articles